Stephen Hopkins

Stephen Hopkins

Biography

Ph.D. in English Literature (w/ Certificate in Germanic Philology), Indiana University (2019)

M.A. in English Literature, Indiana University (2015)

B.A. in Linguistics and Anthropology, Miami University (Ohio) (2011) 

Research Interests

Early Medieval English Literature (Old English); Old Norse Literature; Middle Welsh Literature; Old/Middle Irish Literature; Late Antiquity; Biblical Apocrypha; Religious Literature; Intellectual History; History of Emotions; Linguistics & Philology; Lexicography; the fiction of Tolkien and Lewis

Recent Research Activities

“A New Revelation: the Middle Welsh Erythraean Sibyl,” North American Journal of Celtic Studies 5 (2021). (In Press)

“The Legend of the Holy Rood,” ed. and trans., in New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures, v. II, ed. Tony Burke and Brent Landau (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2020), 145-159.

“An Old English Prose Fragment of Christ’s Letter to Abgar in the Lilly Library,” Notes and Queries 66 (2019): 173-176.

“Snared by the Beasts of Battle: Fear as Hermeneutic Guide in the Old English Exodus,” Philological Quarterly 97.1 (2018): 1-25.

“Heaven and Hell in the Garden of Eden: the Transmissions of the Ystoria Adda in Wales,” Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 37 (2017): 105-123.

“The Manuscript of M.R. James’s ‘The Ash-Tree,’” (with Patrick J. Murphy and Frederick Porcheddu) Notes and Queries 61 (2014): 583-585.


Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • “An Old English Prose Fragment of Christ’s Letter to Abgar in the Lilly Library,” Notes and Queries 66 (2019): 173-176.
  • “Heaven and Hell in the Garden of Eden: the Transmissions of the Ystoria Adda in Wales,” Proceedings of the
    Harvard Celtic Colloquium 37 (2017): 105-123.
  • “Snared by the Beasts of Battle: Fear as Hermeneutic Guide in the Old English Exodus,” Philological Quarterly
    97.1 (2018): 1-25.
  • “The Manuscript of M.R. James’s ‘The Ash-Tree,’” Notes and Queries 61 (2014): 583-585. 

Book Sections/Chapters

  • “The Legend of the Holy Rood,” ed. and trans., in New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures, v. II,
    ed. Tony Burke and Brent Landau (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2020): 145-159.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11390 LIN4105 History of the English Lang World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

PR: Grade of "C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I.

Study of the English language and its development from the Old English language to Modern English.

11391 LIN4680 Modern English Grammar World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

LIN 4680: Modern English Grammar

Course Description:

Can you explain the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs? Between complements and objects? Between clauses and phrases? Between active and passive voice? This grammar class will teach you how.

English grammar is a fascinating subject that transcends questions such as, "Is it ok to end a sentence with a preposition?" Even the simple rules are not as simple as you might think. Experts often disagree, for example, about where to put the comma. Unfortunately, many self-appointed grammar cops know little about how the English language actually works.

It is true that if you're a native speaker of English, you're already an expert. However, this expertise is "innate"--it isn't conscious knowledge, but subconscious knowledge. In this class, you'll learn to consciously understand how your language works so you can enhance your own communication skills.

Making the transition to conscious knowledge will require frequent practice. Because of this, you'll be expected to complete several assignments every week, and you'll be encouraged to complete additional practice exercises on your own.

Please note: Writers benefit from studying grammar in the same way that athletes benefit from studying anatomy. Grammar isn't a "how to write" class any more than anatomy is a "how to play your sport" class, but knowing how English works can help you write more effectively.

This W class will have no required class meetings.

Prerequisites: A grade of ‘C’ (2.0) or better in ENC 1102 and sophomore standing.

16890 LIT6216 Issues in Literary Study Video Strmng (V1) COVD DL exmp W 06:00 PM - 08:50 PM Unavailable

Introduction to Old English Language and Literature

This course provides an introduction to the language and literature of early Medieval England (also called Anglo-Saxon England, roughly 500-1100 CE), and the goal is to arrive at a sound reading knowledge of the Old English language. Drawing upon Peter Baker’s textbook, the first half of the semester focuses on the basics of Old English grammar and vocabulary. While acquiring these rudimentary linguistic skills, we will practice translating short bits of prose and poetry as supplied in the textbook and on Baker’s website. We will move through the grammatical paradigms quickly, since translation is the most efficient and rewarding way to pick up the language. By the midterm exam, we will have covered all the basics of the grammar, and will transition towards more challenging texts to translate together (provided on Canvas). 

The course will also include basic readings from Magennis to orient us towards Old English genres, contexts, and critical/theoretical approaches prevalent in the field, with an emphasis on the history of the book and writing technologies. By the end, we will grapple with excerpts from Beowulf (from Baker), gaining familiarity with Old English poetic diction, accentual-alliterative poetic form, style, syntax, and the basics of paleography by accessing Old English manuscripts via Parker Library on the Web. Students will also complete a conference length research paper on a topic of their choice. 

 

Required Texts: Introduction to Old English, Peter Baker

                        (accompanying exercises) http://www.oldenglishaerobics.net/


The Cambridge Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Literature, Hugh Magennis


Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
82013 LIN4105 History of the English Lang World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

PR: Grade of "C” (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I.

Study of the English language and its development from the Old English language to Modern English.

92193 LIT3931 Topics in World Literature World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

In this course, we will read a broad survey of representative medieval Celtic prose and poetic texts, surveying the vibrant tradition of prose sagas and native legends, while also acknowledging the peripheral situation of Celtic speakers during (and well after) the Middle Ages. We will encounter staples of the medieval Irish and Welsh traditions, including prose texts like The Mabinogi, the Táin Bó Cúailnge, The Evernew Tongue, and the Welsh Triads. The survey will introduce students to standard medieval literary genres and forms, and will also draw upon Post-Colonial criticism to emphasize the military, cultural, and economic ways in which Ireland and Wales were marginalized by contemporary Old and Middle English speakers. Students will finish the course with a thoughtful independent research paper, taking a Post-Colonial approach to the Celtic text of their choice.

Required Texts:

The Mabinogion, Sioned Davies (Oxford World’s Classics)

Early Irish Myths and Sagas, Jeffrey Gantz

Additional online readings posted on our Canvas site.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61775 ENL3451 Topics in British Literature World Wide Web (W) A Unavailable

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 or C.I.

"Vikings: Myths and Sagas"

This course provides an introduction to Old Norse mythology and cosmology, as well as their adaptation into later prose sagas. We will begin with Prose and Poetic Eddas, examining their tales and the ways in which their literary forms change their style and presentation; we will also learn the basic historical and cultural contexts necessary to appreciate these bodies of myth and legend before moving on to consider the ways in which the conversion to Christianity (in the summer of 999) changed Iceland’s literary landscape. Yet even within this new faith, the pagan myths survived and thrived. In the back half of the course, we will focus on texts composed well within the Christian era to investigate the various ways in which Christian Icelanders reckoned with the pagan past of their ancestors in verse and prose. Critically-engaged secondary readings to be supplied by the instructor.

Updated: Jan 27, 2021