Mark L. Kamrath

Mark L. Kamrath, Ph.D.

Mark L. Kamrath is General Editor of the Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition and Co-Director of the Center for Humanities and Digital Research. He teaches early American literature to 1865, the American novel to the Civil War, Native American literature, and courses in bibliography and research as well as digital humanities. He co-edited the Letters and Early Epistolary Writings, Volume 1 of the Collected Writings of Charles Brockden Brown, Bucknell University Press (2013), and has developed with Philip Barnard and others an XML-based archive of all Brown's writings that incorporates TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) standards. He is a member of the Steering Committee and the Executive Council for the Florida Digital Humanities Consortium. He has also served as an MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions Inspector, and as a grant panelist for the National Endowment for the Humanities.  He is currently co-editing a volume of Brown's political pamphlets, and doing research on the body, nature, and natural rights.

Education

  • Ph.D. from University of Nebraska (1996)
  • M.A. from University of Nebraska (1990)
  • B.S. from University of Wisconsin-Madison (1984)

Research Interests

  • Brown and the Early Republic, 1771-1810
  • Eighteenth-Century Periodicals and Print Culture
  • Native American Studies
  • Digital Humanities and Textual Editing

Selected Publications

Books

  • The Collected Writings of Charles Brockden Brown, Volume 1, Letters and Early Epistolary Writings. Ed. Philip Barnard, Elizabeth Hewitt, Mark L. Kamrath. Assistant Editor, William Dorner. Consulting Editors, John R. Holmes and Fritz Fleischmann. Lewisberg: Bucknell UP (2013).
  • The Historicism of Charles Brockden Brown: Radical History and the Early Republic. Kent: Kent State UP (2010).
  • Periodical Literature in Eighteenth-Century America. Ed. Mark L. Kamrath and Sharon M. Harris. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P (2005).
  • Revising Charles Brockden Brown: Culture, Politics, and Sexuality in the Early Republic. Ed. Philip Barnard, Mark L. Kamrath, and Stephen Shapiro. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P (2004)
  • Cather, Willa. Obscure Destinies. 1932. Frederick M. Link with Kari Ronning and Mark Kamrath. The Willa Cather Scholarly Edition. Vol 5. Susan J. Rosowski and James Woodress, Gen. Eds. 13 vols. 1992—. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P (1998).

Articles/Essays

  • “Early America, American Theosophists, Modernity—and India.” Themed Issue on “Desire and Deceit: India in the European’s Gaze” in Collaboration with Imagology Centre, University of Alba-Iulia, Romania. The Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities” 7: 2 (2015): 9-22. http://rupkatha.com/  (peer reviewed)

  • "The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive: Mapping Archival Access."  Mark L. Kamrath, Philip Barnard, Rudy McDaniel, William Dorner, Kevin Jardenah, Patricia Carlton, and Josejuan Rodriguez.  Archive Journal Issue 4, Spring 2014
    http://www.archivejournal.net/issue/4/archives-remixed/the-charles-brockden-brown-electronic-archive-mapping-archival-access-and-metadata/
  • "The Role of Native American Oratory in Republican Discourses and Periodicals of the Early Revolutionary Era, 1741-1775." Periodical Literature in Eighteenth-Century America. Ed. Mark L. Kamrath and Sharon M. Harris. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P (2005). 143-178.
  • "American Exceptionalism and Radicalism in the 'Annals of Europe and America' (1807-1809)." Revising Charles Brockden Brown: Culture, Politics, and Sexuality in the Early Republic. Ed. Philip Barnard, Mark L. Kamrath, and Stephen Shapiro. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P (2004). 354-84.
  • “An ‘inconceivable pleasure’ and the Philadelphia Minerva: Erotic Liberalism, Oriental Tales, and the Female Subject in Periodicals of the Early Republic.” American Periodicals 14 (2004): 3-34.
  • Eyes Wide Shut and the Cultural Poetics of Eighteenth-Century American Periodical Literature.” Early American Literature 37:3 (2002): 497-536.
  • “Charles Brockden Brown and the ‘art of the historian’: An Essay Concerning (Post)modern Historical Understanding.” Journal of the Early Republic 21 (Summer 2001): 231-60.
  • “Charles Brockden Brown and Contemporary Theory: A Review of Recent Critical Trends in Brown Scholarship.” Profils Américains. Ed. M. Amfreville & F. Charras. Université Paul-Valéry: Centre d’ Etudes et de Recherches sur la Culture et la Littérature Américaines, 1999—N. 11. 213-45.
  • "Brown and the Enlightenment: A Study of the Influence of Voltaire's Candide in Edgar Huntly." The American Transcendental Quarterly. New Series 5 (March 1991): 5-14.

Miscellaneous Publications

  • "Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage," "Union Humane Society," "New England Anti-Slavery Society," and "American Anti-Slavery Society" in Slavery in the United States: A Social, Political, and Historical Encyclopedia . 2 vols. Series. Ed. Junius P. Rodriguez. Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio, Inc, 2007. 161-162, 401, 455-456, and 489-490.
  • “Historiography: United States.” Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era. Ed. Christopher John Murray. Vol. 1. New York and London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 2003. 509-510.
  • “Recent Charles Brockden Brown Bibliography.” Profils Américains. Ed. M. Amfreville & F. Charras. Université Paul-Valéry: Centre d’ Etudes et de Recherches sur la Culture et la Littérature Américaines, 1999—N. 11. 269-77.
  • "Caroline Matilda Warren Thayer." American Women Prose Writers to 1820. Ed. Carla Mulford with Angela Vietto and Amy Winans. The Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 200. Detroit: Gale Research, 1998. 365-72.

Awards

  • 2014-2015 Research Incentive Award(RIA)
  • 2013 College of Arts and Humanities Excellence in Research Award
  • 2012-2013 Teaching Incentive Program Award (TIP)
  • 2012-2015 National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access."Creating the Charles Brockden Brown Archive," Mark Kamrath PI and Rudy McDaniel Co-PI, 200,000.00. Philip Barnard, Textual Editor.
  • 2011 College of Arts and Humanities Interdisciplinary Grant, University of Central Florida. The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive. 7,500.
  • 2010-2012 National Endowment for the Humanities Scholarly Editions Grant. "The Letters of Charles Brockden Brown." Mark Kamrath, PI. Co-edited with Philip Barnard and Elizabeth Hewitt, 170,000.00.
  • 2009-2010 Research Incentive Award (RIA)
  • 2008 College of Arts and Humanities Interdisciplinary Grant, University of Central Florida. The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition. 15,985.00
  • 2006 College of Arts and Humanities Interdisciplinary Grant, University of Central Florida. The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition. 21,766.00
  • Disinguished Scholar of the Inaugural Scholars' Summit, Willa Cather Scholarly Edition, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, June 23-25, 2004
  • 2004 Teaching Incentive Program Award (TIP)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19410 ENG3817 Digital Archives Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
91262 AML3640 Native American Literature Face2Face M,W,F 12:30PM - 1:20PM Not Online
AML3640.0001: Native American Literature
(Kamrath)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102 and ENC 1102

This course structure is primarily historical, but it also uses region and culture in ways that are appropriate for various course goals. In contrast to the often romantic depiction of the American Indian in history or films like Dances with Wolves, this course surveys Native American literature from its traditional origins—including tales, songs, and oratory—to more modern responses in autobiography, fiction, poetry, and other contemporary genres by writers such as N. Scott Momaday and Louise Erdrich. In addition to learning about an alternate history and culture of North America and the “oral tradition” in different periods and regions, this course aims to explore a series of thematic and aesthetic continuities and to understand the various issues that face Native Americans both on and off reservation communities today. This course uses You Tube, film, and other media as part of its instruction. Course requirements include significant reading, participation, brief written responses, a 6-7 page critical paper, and a midterm and final exam.

(Note: This course fulfills the pre-1865 historical requirement. To enroll in this course, you must have previously taken ENC1101 and ENC 1102. Failure to meet the prerequisites for a course can result in failing the course. ENG 3014 is highly recommended, but not required.)
80760 ENG5009 Methods Bibleo & Research Web Web Not Online
Beyond the general aim of introducing you to a range of research methods and related professional issues in the field of English, this course has several goals. First, it aims to review current approaches to literary and cultural studies, including the field of technical writing, and ways, for example, that feminist and “border” studies enable us to engage texts from provocative points of view. Second, we will focus on basic tools of literary scholarship and the kinds of questions—and answers—that lead to productive library research. Our purpose in doing that is to go beyond “Google” and to become adept with the use of various print and electronic resources as well as appropriate research strategies. Third, we will examine specific bibliographical, critical, and textual problems; this will give us further practical experience in collecting research materials, weighing evidence, reaching conclusions, and constructing scholarly arguments.

Course requirements include access to UCF WebCourses, weekly reading and discussion postings, individual and collaborative research assignments, an annotated bibliography, and a final exam.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61182 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web A Web Not Online
AML 3031.AW61: American Literature I
(Kamrath)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This survey course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of colonization to the mid-19th century, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage as well as texts by women writers frequently excluded from literary collections. Since this course covers writings from Native American sources through the Civil War, we will become familiar with the historical circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas—-assumptions, myths, and beliefs—that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose, poetry, and fictional works, we will also closely examine their aesthetic or rhetorical dimensions and practice ways of identifying representative issues and themes. The course uses You Tube, film, and other media as part of its instruction.

Course requirements include weekly reading and discussion; several brief essays, along with a 6-7 page critical paper, and a mid-term and final examination. (Note: To enroll in this course you must have previously taken ENC1101 and ENC 1102. ENG 3014 is highly recommended. This course satisfies the “Literary History” requirement)
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10063 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Rdce Time M,W 1:30PM - 2:20PM Not Online
AML3031.0001: American Literature I
(Kamrath)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This “survey” course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of colonization to the mid-19th century, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage as well as texts by women writers frequently excluded from literary collections. Since this course covers writings from Native American sources through the Civil War, we will become familiar with the historical circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas—-assumptions, myths, and beliefs—that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose (sermons, autobiography, etc), poetry, and fictional works, we will also closely examine their aesthetic or rhetorical dimensions and practice ways of identifying representative issues and themes. Brief You Tube clips will be used to help contextualize readings.

Course requirements include weekly reading and discussion; several brief essays, along with a 6-7 page critical paper, and a mid-term and final examination. (Note: To enroll in this course you must have previously taken ENC1101 and ENC 1102. ENG 3014 is highly recommended. This course satisfies the “Literary History” requirement)
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80820 ENG5009 Methods Bibleo & Research Web Web Not Online
ENG5009.0W61: Methods of Bibliography and Research
(Kamrath)

PR: Graduate status or senior standing

Beyond the general aim of introducing you to a range of research methods and related professional issues in the field of English, this course has several goals. First, it aims to review current approaches to literary and cultural studies, including the field of technical writing, and ways, for example, that feminist and “border” studies enable us to engage texts from provocative points of view. Second, we will focus on basic tools of literary scholarship and the kinds of questions—and answers—that lead to productive library research. Our purpose in doing that is to go beyond “Google” and to become adept with the use of various print and electronic resources as well as appropriate research strategies. Third, we will examine specific bibliographical, critical, and textual problems; this will give us further practical experience in collecting research materials, weighing evidence, reaching conclusions, and constructing scholarly arguments.

Course requirements include access to UCF WebCourses, weekly reading and discussion postings, individual and collaborative research assignments, an annotated bibliography, and a final exam.
92134 LIT6216 Issues in Literary Study Rdce Time Tu 7:30PM - 9:00PM Not Online
LIT 6216 Issues in Literary Study (Kamrath)

The Body and Natural Rights

What happened in the Garden of Eden? What is the relationship between “nature” and the human body? What is the difference between “nakedness” and “nudity”? Using a New Historicist, interdisciplinary approach, this course chronologically explores how the human body has been depicted in American literature from the colonial period to the present. In addition to the Puritans and the poetry of Walt Whitman and the Beat Poets of the 1960s, the course pays particular attention to novels that were once banned as “obscene” and the “erotic romance” and the manner in which they represent, or resist, cultural attitudes about the body and human sexuality. The course also traces how “public nudity” has been woven into the fabric of American society and associated with an ideology of personal “freedom”—and even social protest and environmental activism. Students will be expected to learn about Biblical, classical, and early modern attitudes toward the body, to read and write critically about how such attitudes have changed relative to civil rights legislation, and to reflect on contemporary representations of the body in popular culture.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50847 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web A Web Not Online
AML3031.AW59: American Literature I
(Kamrath)

PR: Grade of C (2.0) or better required in ENC 1102

This "survey" course is designed to introduce you to a wide and rich variety of literature from the period of colonization to the mid-19th century, including works representing some of the diverse ethnic and racial strands of our literary heritage as well as texts by women writers frequently excluded from literary collections. Since this course covers writings from Native American sources through the Civil War, we will become familiar with the historical circumstances surrounding the production of a given text and explore the development and expression of some fundamental ideas--assumptions, myths, and beliefs--that still influence the ways Americans think about themselves and their society. In addition to studying a range of prose (sermons, autobiography, etc.), poetry, and fiction works, we will also closely examine their aesthetic or rhetorical dimensions and practice ways of identifying representative issues and themes. Brief YouTube clips will be used to help contextualize readings.

Course requirements include weekly reading and discussions; several brief essays, along with a 6-7 page critical paper, and a mid-term and final examination.
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